Philadelphia Gentlemen

Philadelphia Gentlemen PDF
Author: E. Digby Baltzell
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412830753
Size: 41.30 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 476
View: 7351

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This proper Philadelphia story starts with the city’s golden age at the close of the eighteenth century. It is a classic study of an American business aristocracy of colonial stock with Protestant affiliations as well as an analysis of how fabulously wealthy nineteenth-century family founders in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, supported various exclusive institutions that in the course of the twentieth century produced a national upper-class way of life. But as that way of life became an end of itself, instead of an effort to consolidate power and control, the upper-class outlived its function; this, argues Baltzell, is precisely what took place in the Philadelphia class system. Philadelphia Gentlemen emphasizes that class is largely a matter of family, whereas an elite is largely a matter of individual achievement. The emphasis in Philadelphia on old classes, in contrast to the emphasis in New York and Boston on individual achievement and elite striving, helps to explain the dramatically different outcomes of ruling class domination in major centers of the Eastern Establishment. In emphasizing class membership or family prestige, the dynamics of industrial and urban life passed by rather than through Philadelphia. As a result in the race for urban preeminence, Philadelphia lost precious time and eventually lost the struggle for ruling preeminence as such. When the book initially appeared, it was hailed by The New York Times as “a very, very important book.” Writing in the pages of the American Sociological Review, Seymour Martin Lipset noted that “Philadelphia Gentlemen says important things about class and power in America, and says them in ways that will interest and fascinate both sociologists and laymen.” And in the American Historical Review, Baltzell’s book was identified simply as “a gold mine of information.” In short, for sociologists, historians, and those concerned with issues of culture and the economy, this is indeed a classic of modern social science.

Philadelphia Gentlemen

Philadelphia Gentlemen PDF
Author: E. Digby Baltzell
Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing
ISBN: 1789124115
Size: 33.74 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 431
View: 2172

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Although primarily a Proper Philadelphia story that starts with the city's Golden Age at the close of the eighteenth century, this classic study of an American business aristocracy of colonial stock and Protestant (largely Episcopalian) affiliations is also an analysis of how fabulously wealthy, nineteenth-century family founders in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia supported a series of class-creating institutions outside the family. These institutions included: the New England boarding schools; Harvard, Yale, and Princeton; and urban men's clubs and suburban country clubs. They produced, in the course of the twentieth century, a national, intercity, upper-class way of life. Philadelphia Gentlemen shows how this class reached its peak of power and influence in America on the eve of the Second World War. “Writing both as a Philadelphian and a sociologist, Mr, Baltzell has dissected the upper-class structure of his native city with results as fascinating as they are illuminating.”—John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate “In constructing a picture of the proper Philadelphian. Baltzell has made use of masses of printed material and some manuscript sources, there is little on Philadelphia and Philadelphia families which he has neglected....a gold mine of information.”—American Historical Review “Philadelphia Gentlemen says important things about class and power in America, and says it in ways that will interest and fascinate; both sociologists and laymen.”—Seymour Martin Lipset “This is a very, very important book.”—The New York Times Book Review

Philadelphia Gentlemen

Philadelphia Gentlemen PDF
Author: Roger L. Geiger
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351499890
Size: 40.42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 476
View: 5146

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This proper Philadelphia story starts with the city's golden age at the close of the eighteenth century. It is a classic study of an American business aristocracy of colonial stock with Protestant affiliations as well as an analysis of how fabulously wealthy nineteenth-century family founders in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, supported various exclusive institutions that in the course of the twentieth century produced a national upper-class way of life. But as that way of life became an end of itself, instead of an effort to consolidate power and control, the upper-class outlived its function; this, argues Baltzell, is precisely what took place in the Philadelphia class system.Philadelphia Gentlemen emphasizes that class is largely a matter of family, whereas an elite is largely a matter of individual achievement. The emphasis in Philadelphia on old classes, in contrast to the emphasis in New York and Boston on individual achievement and elite striving, helps to explain the dramatically different outcomes of ruling class domination in major centers of the Eastern Establishment. In emphasizing class membership or family prestige, the dynamics of industrial and urban life passed by rather than through Philadelphia. As a result in the race for urban preeminence, Philadelphia lost precious time and eventually lost the struggle for ruling preeminence as such.When the book initially appeared, it was hailed by The New York Times as "a very, very important book." Writing in the pages of the American Sociological Review, Seymour Martin Lipset noted that "Philadelphia Gentlemen says important things about class and power in America, and says them in ways that will interest and fascinate both sociologists and laymen." And in the American Historical Review, Baltzell's book was identified simply as "a gold mine of information." In short, for sociologists, historians, and those concerned with issues of culture and

Philadelphia Gentlemen

Philadelphia Gentlemen PDF
Author: Edward Digby Baltzell
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 47.20 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Philadelphia (Pa.)
Languages : en
Pages :
View: 1055

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Sporting Gentlemen

Sporting Gentlemen PDF
Author: E. Digby Baltzell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351488341
Size: 26.81 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Sports & Recreation
Languages : en
Pages : 441
View: 2771

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Tennis is a high-stakes game, played by prodigies identified early and coached by professionals in hopes of high rankings and endorsements. This commercial world is far removed from the origins of the sport. Before 1968—when Wimbledon invited professional players to compete for the first time—tennis was part of a sportsmanship tradition that emphasized character over money. It produced well-rounded gentlemen who expressed a code of honor, not commerce. In this authoritative and affectionate history of men's tennis, distinguished sociologist E. Digby Baltzell recovers the glory of the age. From its aristocratic origins in the late ninteenth century, to the Tilden years, and through a succession of newcomers, the amateur era and its virtues survived a century of democratization and conflict. Sporting Gentlemen examines the greatest players and matches in the history of tennis. Baltzell explores the tennis code of honor and its roots in the cricket code of the late-nineteenth-century Anglo-American upper class. This code of honor remained in spite of the later democratization of tennis. Thus, the court manners of the Renshaw twins and Doherty brothers at the Old Wimbledon were upheld to the letter by Don Budge and Jack Kramer as well as Rod Laver, John Newcombe, and Arthur Ashe. Baltzell's final chapter on the Open Era is a blistering attack on the decline of honor and the obliteration of class distinctions, leaving only those based on money. For all who love the game of tennis, Sporting Gentlemen is both fascinating history and a badly needed analysis of what has made the sport great.

Philadelphia Gentlemen

Philadelphia Gentlemen PDF
Author: Edward Digby Baltzell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780887387890
Size: 19.59 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 466
View: 2118

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This proper Philadelphia story starts with the city's golden age at the close of the eighteenth century. It is a classic study of an American business aristocracy of colonial stock with Protestant affiliations as well as an analysis of how fabulously wealthy nineteenth-century family founders in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, supported various exclusive institutions that in the course of the twentieth century produced a national upper-class way of life. But as that way of life became an end of itself, instead of an effort to consolidate power and control, the upper-class outlived its function; this, argues Baltzell, is precisely what took place in the Philadelphia class system. Philadelphia Gentlemen emphasizes that class is largely a matter of family, whereas an elite is largely a matter of individual achievement. The emphasis in Philadelphia on old classes, in contrast to the emphasis in New York and Boston on individual achievement and elite striving, helps to explain the dramatically different outcomes of ruling class domination in major centers of the Eastern Establishment. In emphasizing class membership or family prestige, the dynamics of industrial and urban life passed by rather than through Philadelphia. As a result in the race for urban preeminence, Philadelphia lost precious time and eventually lost the struggle for ruling preeminence as such. When the book initially appeared, it was hailed by The New York Times as “a very, very important book.” Writing in the pages of the American Sociological Review, Seymour Martin Lipset noted that “Philadelphia Gentlemen says important things about class and power in America, and says them in ways that will interest and fascinate both sociologists and laymen.” And in the American Historical Review, Baltzell's book was identified simply as “a gold mine of information.” In short, for sociologists, historians, and those concerned with issues of culture and the economy, this is indeed a classic of modern social science.

Religion Out Loud

Religion Out Loud PDF
Author: Isaac Weiner
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814708072
Size: 78.81 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Religion
Languages : en
Pages : 264
View: 5707

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For six months in 2004, controversy raged in Hamtramck, Michigan, as residents debated a proposed amendment that would exempt the adhan, or Islamic call to prayer, from the city’s anti-noise ordinance. The call to prayer functioned as a flashpoint in disputes about the integration of Muslims into this historically Polish‑Catholic community. No one openly contested Muslims’ right to worship in their mosques, but many neighbors framed their resistance around what they regarded as the inappropriate public pronouncement of Islamic presence, an announcement that audibly intruded upon their public space. Throughout U.S. history, complaints about religion as noise have proven useful both for restraining religious dissent and for circumscribing religion’s boundaries more generally. At the same time, religious individuals and groups rarely have kept quiet. They have insisted on their right to practice religion out loud, implicitly advancing alternative understandings of religion and its place in the modern world. In Religion Out Loud, Isaac Weiner takes such sonic disputes seriously. Weaving the story of religious “noise” through multiple historical eras and diverse religious communities, he convincingly demonstrates that religious pluralism has never been solely a matter of competing values, truth claims, or moral doctrines, but of different styles of public practice, of fundamentally different ways of using body and space—and that these differences ultimately have expressed very different conceptions of religion itself. Weiner’s innovative work encourages scholars to pay much greater attention to the publicly contested sensory cultures of American religious life.

Becoming Penn

Becoming Penn PDF
Author: John L. Puckett
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812291085
Size: 35.24 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 464
View: 6403

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The second half of the twentieth century saw the University of Pennsylvania grow in size as well as in stature. On its way to becoming one of the world's most celebrated research universities, Penn exemplified the role of urban renewal in the postwar redevelopment and expansion of urban universities, and the indispensable part these institutions played in the remaking of American cities. Yet urban renewal is only one aspect of this history. Drawing from Philadelphia's extensive archives as well as the University's own historical records and publications, John L. Puckett and Mark Frazier Lloyd examine Penn's rise to eminence amid the social, moral, and economic forces that transformed major public and private institutions across the nation. Becoming Penn recounts the shared history of university politics and urban policy as the campus grappled with twentieth-century racial tensions, gender inequality, labor conflicts, and economic retrenchment. Examining key policies and initiatives of the administrations led by presidents Gaylord Harnwell, Martin Meyerson, Sheldon Hackney, and Judith Rodin, Puckett and Lloyd revisit the actors, organizations, and controversies that shaped campus life in this turbulent era. Illustrated with archival photographs of the campus and West Philadelphia neighborhood throughout the late twentieth century, Becoming Penn provides a sweeping portrait of one university's growth and impact within the broader social history of American higher education.

A Judgment For Solomon

A Judgment for Solomon PDF
Author: Michael Grossberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521557450
Size: 67.45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 270
View: 4228

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A Judgment for Solomon tells the story of the d'Hauteville case, a controversial child custody battle fought in 1840. It uses the story of one couple's bitter fight over their son to explore some timebound and timeless features of American legal culture. In a narrative analysis, it recounts how marital woes led Ellen and Gonzalve d'Hauteville into what Alexis de Tocqueville called the 'shadow of the law'. Their multiple legal experiences culminated in an eagerly followed Philadelphia trial that sparked a national debate over the legal rights and duties of mothers and fathers, and husbands and wives. The story of the d'Hauteville case explains why popular trials become 'precedents of legal experience' - mediums for debates about highly contested social issues. It also demonstrates the ability of individual women and men to contribute to legal change by turning to the law to fight for what they want.