The Cambridge History Of Fifteenth Century Music

The Cambridge History of Fifteenth Century Music PDF
Author: Anna Maria Busse Berger
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316298299
Size: 53.35 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages :
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Through forty-five creative and concise essays by an international team of authors, this Cambridge History brings the fifteenth century to life for both specialists and general readers. Combining the best qualities of survey texts and scholarly literature, the book offers authoritative overviews of central composers, genres, and musical institutions as well as new and provocative reassessments of the work concept, the boundaries between improvisation and composition, the practice of listening, humanism, musical borrowing, and other topics. Multidisciplinary studies of music and architecture, feasting, poetry, politics, liturgy, and religious devotion rub shoulders with studies of compositional techniques, musical notation, music manuscripts, and reception history. Generously illustrated with figures and examples, this volume paints a vibrant picture of musical life in a period characterized by extraordinary innovation and artistic achievement.

The Cambridge History Of Sixteenth Century Music

The Cambridge History of Sixteenth Century Music PDF
Author: Iain Fenlon
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108671276
Size: 71.85 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages :
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Part of the seminal Cambridge History of Music series, this volume departs from standard histories of early modern Western music in two important ways. First, it considers music as something primarily experienced by people in their daily lives, whether as musicians or listeners, and as something that happened in particular locations, and different intellectual and ideological contexts, rather than as a story of genres, individual counties, and composers and their works. Second, by constraining discussion within the limits of a 100-year timespan, the music culture of the sixteenth century is freed from its conventional (and tenuous) absorption within the abstraction of 'the Renaissance', and is understood in terms of recent developments in the broader narrative of this turbulent period of European history. Both an original take on a well-known period in early music and a key work of reference for scholars, this volume makes an important contribution to the history of music.

The Cambridge History Of Medieval Music

The Cambridge History of Medieval Music PDF
Author: Mark Everist
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108577075
Size: 16.94 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages :
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Spanning a millennium of musical history, this monumental volume brings together nearly forty leading authorities to survey the music of Western Europe in the Middle Ages. All of the major aspects of medieval music are considered, making use of the latest research and thinking to discuss everything from the earliest genres of chant, through the music of the liturgy, to the riches of the vernacular song of the trouvères and troubadours. Alongside this account of the core repertory of monophony, The Cambridge History of Medieval Music tells the story of the birth of polyphonic music, and studies the genres of organum, conductus, motet and polyphonic song. Key composers of the period are introduced, such as Leoninus, Perotinus, Adam de la Halle, Philippe de Vitry and Guillaume de Machaut, and other chapters examine topics ranging from musical theory and performance to institutions, culture and collections.

The Cambridge History Of Nineteenth Century Music

The Cambridge History of Nineteenth Century Music PDF
Author: Jim Samson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521590174
Size: 24.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 772
View: 5863

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First published in 2002, this comprehensive overview of music in the nineteenth century draws on extensive scholarship in the field.

The Cambridge History Of Twentieth Century Music

The Cambridge History of Twentieth Century Music PDF
Author: John Butt
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521662567
Size: 31.51 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 818
View: 2586

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"Music" referred only to the artistic, classical tradition of Western Europe and North America at the beginning of the twentieth century. However, several different traditions emerged by the end of the century. Written by experts in the field, this book surveys how the Western tradition was affected by the development of jazz, popular music, and world music and links the history of music with that of its social contexts.

The Cambridge History Of Seventeenth Century Music

The Cambridge History of Seventeenth Century Music PDF
Author: Lecturer in Music Royal Holloway and Bedford New College Tim Carter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521792738
Size: 68.61 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 591
View: 1337

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A comprehensive study of European musical culture in the seventeenth century.

Studies In Historical Improvisation

Studies in Historical Improvisation PDF
Author: Massimiliano Guido
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317048946
Size: 71.82 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 220
View: 1765

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In recent years, scholars and musicians have become increasingly interested in the revival of musical improvisation as it was known in the Renaissance and Baroque periods. This historically informed practice is now supplanting the late Romantic view of improvised music as a rhapsodic endeavour—a musical blossoming out of the capricious genius of the player—that dominated throughout the twentieth century. In the Renaissance and Baroque eras, composing in the mind (alla mente) had an important didactic function. For several categories of musicians, the teaching of counterpoint happened almost entirely through practice on their own instruments. This volume offers the first systematic exploration of the close relationship among improvisation, music theory, and practical musicianship from late Renaissance into the Baroque era. It is not a historical survey per se, but rather aims to re-establish the importance of such a combination as a pedagogical tool for a better understanding of the musical idioms of these periods. The authors are concerned with the transferral of historical practices to the modern classroom, discussing new ways of revitalising the study and appreciation of early music. The relevance and utility of such an improvisation-based approach also changes our understanding of the balance between theoretical and practical sources in the primary literature, as well as the concept of music theory itself. Alongside a word-centred theoretical tradition, in which rules are described in verbiage and enriched by musical examples, we are rediscovering the importance of a music-centred tradition, especially in Spain and Italy, where the music stands alone and the learner must distil the rules by learning and playing the music. Throughout its various sections, the volume explores the path of improvisation from theory to practice and back again.

The Cambridge History Of Musical Performance

The Cambridge History of Musical Performance PDF
Author: Colin Lawson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316184420
Size: 67.12 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages :
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The intricacies and challenges of musical performance have recently attracted the attention of writers and scholars to a greater extent than ever before. Research into the performer's experience has begun to explore such areas as practice techniques, performance anxiety and memorisation, as well as many other professional issues. Historical performance practice has been the subject of lively debate way beyond academic circles, mirroring its high profile in the recording studio and the concert hall. Reflecting the strong ongoing interest in the role of performers and performance, this History brings together research from leading scholars and historians and, importantly, features contributions from accomplished performers, whose practical experiences give the volume a unique vitality. Moving the focus away from the composers and onto the musicians responsible for bringing the music to life, this History presents a fresh, integrated and innovative perspective on performance history and practice, from the earliest times to today.

Renaissance Polyphony

Renaissance Polyphony PDF
Author: Fabrice Fitch
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108882668
Size: 63.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages :
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This engaging study introduces Renaissance polyphony to a modern audience. It helps readers of all ages and levels of experience make sense of what they are hearing. How does Renaissance music work? How is a piece typical of its style and type; or, if it is exceptional, what makes it so? The makers of polyphony were keenly aware of the specialized nature of their craft. How is this reflected in the music they wrote, and how were they regarded by their patrons and audiences? Through a combination of detailed, nuanced appreciation of musical style and a lucid overview of current debates, this book offers a glimpse of meanings behind and beyond the notes, be they playful or profound. It will enhance the listening experience of students, performers and music lovers alike.

Aspects Of Early English Keyboard Music Before C 1630

Aspects of Early English Keyboard Music before c 1630 PDF
Author: David J. Smith
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351613871
Size: 72.21 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Music
Languages : en
Pages : 246
View: 5417

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English keyboard music reached an unsurpassed level of sophistication in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries as organists such as William Byrd and his students took a genre associated with domestic, amateur performance and treated it as seriously as vocal music. This book draws together important research on the music, its sources and the instruments on which it was played. There are two chapters on instruments: John Koster on the use of harpsichord during the period, and Dominic Gwynn on the construction of Tudor-style organs based on the surviving evidence we have for them. This leads to a section devoted to organ performance practice in a liturgical context, in which John Harper discusses what the use of organs pitched in F may imply about their use in alternation with vocal polyphony, and Magnus Williamson explores improvisational practice in the Tudor period. The next section is on sources and repertoire, beginning with Frauke Jürgensen and Rachelle Taylor’s chapter on Clarifica me Pater settings, which grows naturally out of the consideration of improvisation in the previous chapter. The next two contributions focus on two of the most important individual manuscript sources: Tihomir Popović challenges assumptions about My Ladye Nevells Booke by reflecting on what the manuscript can tell us about aristocratic culture, and David J. Smith provides a detailed study of the famous Fitzwilliam Virginal Book. The discussion then broadens out into Pieter Dirksen’s consideration of a wider selection of sources relating to John Bull, which in turn connects closely to David Leadbetter’s work on Gibbons, lute sources and questions of style.